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Dropbox on a laptop

While Dropbox was quick to embrace transparency reports, it's been pretty opaque about data requests from outside the US. How do you know which countries want your info? You don't have to wonder any longer. The cloud storage outfit has published its first transparency report revealing data requests from beyond American borders. There aren't many at all (just 20 in total), but it's clear that some governments are nosier than others. Half of all requests came from France and Germany, while the rest are spread between nations as far-ranging as Australia and Brazil. The report now covers the number of accounts affected by these demands, too. More detailed stats won't do much to end intrusive surveillance, but they'll at least let you know who might be poking around your online files.

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Samsung's profits have been on an upward swing driven by several popular versions of its Galaxy smartphones, but 2014 is going into the books as an off year. It still posted a $4.88 billion profit in Q4, but for the year it was down 32 percent from 2013 and had the lowest profit since 2011, which can be traced to a drop in smartphone shipments. So what's the plan for 2015? Other than shipping more of those curved SUHD TVs we saw, it's focusing on phone sales in India and China, planning a "diversified portfolio with unique designs" of wearable devices and launching more new phones like the Galaxy A series. It's also focusing on its processor building business, and it seems more likely than ever that the next round of Galaxy phones will have Samsung CPUs inside instead of Qualcomm. That might not be enough to keep up with the Joneses Apple for the coming year, but it will have to do.

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Delaware driver's license on a phone

For all the recent talk of moving to digital wallets, you can't really ditch the old-school kind yet -- you still need to carry physical copies of your driver's license and other forms of ID. If you live in Delaware, though, you may eventually have one less reason to worry when you leave your purse or wallet at home. The state's Senate recently passed a resolution asking the Division of Motor Vehicles to research a digital driver's license that you would store in an app on your phone. While many of the details still have to be worked out, you'd use some kind of biometric security (such as your face, fingerprint or voice) to get access on top of a code. There's no timetable for when Delaware would test these licenses, but it may not take long given that the state's development partner, MorphoTrust, has been working on the technology for a while.

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PlayStation Vue in the real world

When Sony unveiled its PlayStation Vue streaming service, it painted a rosy picture of what you'll get: tons of channels! You'll never look at TV the same way again! But what's it like to use in the real world? You won't have to wait until the formal launch to find out, apparently. One early user has shared impressions with GigaOM, and the early signs suggest that it might just beat Dish's Sling TV... in certain circumstances, anyway. The interface is polished and speedy, and your viewing rights are much more consistent than what Sling TV delivers. As a rule, you can assume that you'll have the promised 28-day window to watch saved shows from a cloud DVR.

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Qualcomm's presence inside many of the world's most popular mobile devices over the last few years has kept the money coming in (creating the need for the picture shown above), but today there was some bad news. In its Q4 earnings release, the company revealed (PDF) "Expectations that our Snapdragon 810 processor will not be in the upcoming design cycle of a large customer's flagship device." Uh-oh. Even though it didn't say who the large customer is, for years there have been expectations that Samsung would eventually stop relying on Qualcomm chips to run many of its Galaxy phones.

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SpaceX Falcon Heavy in animated form

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy has yet to grace a launch pad, but that isn't stopping the company from extolling the reusable rocket's virtues. Elon Musk and crew have posted an animation (below) demonstrating how a typical mission with the heavy-duty reusable rocket should go. As you might imagine, everything goes smoothly in this conceptual clip -- the machine blasts off from Kennedy Space Center, detaches its Falcon 9 boosters (which dutifully return to the ground) and puts its payload into orbit. Success!

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LISBON - DECEMBER 20, 2013: Photo of Facebook homepage on a monitor screen through a magnifying glass.

While Facebook made waves last year with its investment in Oculus and WhatsApp, it continues to make most of its money from just plain ol' Facebook. And, in particular, from mobile. In the last quarter of 2014, the social networking giant made $3.85 billion. Of that revenue, about $3.59 billion was from advertising, and ads from mobile accounted for a whopping 69 percent of that. That means Facebook now makes almost two-thirds of its money just from mobile advertising. Facebook also posted its overall numbers for 2014, where it made $12.47 billion for the year alone. It marks the first time the company's made over $10 billion in a single year.

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There aren't many work collaboration tools that you'd describe as being a joy to use, but Slack, the latest startup from Flickr co-founder Stewart Butterfield, actually manages to come close. Now in addition to slick text and document collaboration (it's crazy fast), Slack will soon get voice and video chat, as well as remote screensharing. The company announced today that it's snapped up Screenhero, a startup that was aiming to go toe-to-toe with the likes of Webex, whose features will slowly be absorbed into the Slack platform. It's not the first collaboration tool to get video and voice chat -- HipChat has had them for a while, and plenty of organizations use a combination of Microsoft's Yammer and Skype -- but their addition gives people one less reason to count Slack out as they beg their companies to adopt it (ahem, Engadget editors).

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Snapchat's already working on a library of original content, and thanks to AT&T, there will soon be shows for viewing inside the app as well. Re/code reports that a "scripted series" with 12 episodes will feature YouTube personalities like Freddie Wong and Harley Morenstein -- in addition to the Snapchat-famous Shaun McBride. This "SnapperHero" project isn't part of the app's Discover content channel, though, as AT&T is sponsoring the videos, so they're more like produced two-minute ad spots. Yahoo and others were also rumored to be considering YouTube's "talent," so we'll see how pairing popular internet things turns out. The "show" is set to debut in the near future as the number of folks leveraging the ephemeral sharing service's platform continues to grow.

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