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Here's a friendly tip for all wildlife photographers out there: don't let mischievous monkeys (and other jungle animals) push the shutter in your stead. The U.S. Copyright Office just released a new public draft of its compendium of practices, and in it, the agency clearly states that it will only recognize original works created by a human being. This new section's first example of works it cannot register? "A photograph taken by a monkey," alluding to the controversial simian selfies that took the internet by storm weeks ago. People have been debating whether photographer David Slater actually owned the right to those images (a couple of which you can see above) since the black crested macaque used the equipment he set up. Slater even made plans to bring Wikipedia to court for refusing to take those pictures off the website, which he claims has been robbing him of much-needed royalties.

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According to reports from both The Wrap and Deadline, Steven Spielberg is trying to resurrect Minority Report as a TV series. The original movie was a science-fiction styled thriller set in the near-future - and its ideas on gesture-based interfaces have been referenced ever since. Fast Company even elaborated on seven crime-fighting technologies featured in the movie that had inspired real-life techniques. Other tech referenced in the 2002 movie included e-paper, retina scanners and advertising with facial recognition built-in. Spielberg wants the show to be produced by his company Amblin Entertainment and is looking to hook Godzilla writer Max Borenstein to pen it. Deadline adds that the project remains at the "very early stages of development." And in case you forgot, the movie itself was (pretty loosely) based on a short story by Philip K. Dick. If the TV series does happen, maybe it'll get a novelization -- and the circle will be complete.

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We already know that the United States Congress (or the countless people it employs) can't seem to stop editing Wikipedia articles, but do they need to be such jerks about it? Case in point: Wiki tinkerers using an IP address connected to the US House of Representatives have been blocked from making edits to articles for the third time this summer. The first two bans were relatively short, but this time the block will stick for a month because a congressional staffer (or staffers) associated with the IP address made a handful of offensive edits that denigrated transgender people. And the straw that seemed to break the admin's back? A particularly distasteful change to the page devoted to Orange Is The New Black.

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If a wireless charger doesn't work with a phone or tablet with the capability, it's likely because they adhere to two different wireless charging standards. See, there's more than one out there, and that's making it hard for businesses, venues, offices and even OEMs to adopt the technology. One product that could potentially help with those issues is a new wireless charger called ChargeSpot Pocket, which works with both Qi Wireless and PMA or Power Matters Alliance. Sure, that's just two standards out of three (leaving out the third one called A4WP), but the product can certainly cater to more customers than an alternative that works with only one standard can.

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Thinking about using a hashtag in your next tweet? Watch out -- Twitter might use it as an excuse to attach a video or image to your message. A promotion for ABC's new TV comedy "Selfie" revealed that Twitter can now prompt users to attach media to a tweet based on the hashtags they use. iOS users who compose a message with #SelfieABC, for instance, will be asked if they want to attach the TV show's first episode in the tweet.

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Love LTE data speeds, but fear the bane of network congestion? Researchers at NTT Docomo and Huawei may have a solution. The two firms just announced that it has successfully broadcast LTE service on the unlicensed 5GHz spectrum -- a frequency typically used for WiFi. Potentially, the 5GHz band could be used to enhance LTE service in high-use areas, a practice researchers are calling License-Assisted Access (LAA). LAA isn't an official standard yet, but Huawei and NTT Docomo plan to continue working together to support it. The specifics are a little granular, sure, but we're not about to scoff at getting better reception. Check out the duo's official statement at the source link below.

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Most of the wearable gadgets getting people hot and bothered either strap onto your face or your wrist, but Swiss startup noonee has cooked up a little something that straps to your legs instead. Well, fine, maybe it's not exactly little: in a bid to keep factory line workers more alert and more comfortable during their shifts, the five person team has developed a locking leg support device they call the Chairless Chair. Once you get strapped in, all it takes is a press of a button to get settled -- the aluminum and carbon fiber frame holds whatever position your legs take and essentially becomes, well, an invisible chair. The secret sauce here is a battery-powered dampening system eases the load on your lower back and legs by supporting the your body weight and directing it down into your heels. Noonee's curious wearable is still firmly in the prototype phase (though Audi and BMW will soon take the thing for spin on its production lines) but if it works as well as the team says it does, expect every haggard commuter -- or frenzied blogger cranking out stories at a trade show -- to own one soon enough.

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Estimote Sticker on a flower pot

The problem with the internet of things is that you often have to buy expensive add-ons or replacements to get all those clever sensors; you may not want to buy a bike computer just to track your rides. If Estimote has its way, you won't have to. Its new Sticker beacons let you graft wireless sensors on to nearly any object, giving it location, motion and temperature data that you can check through apps. You can figure out the length of your last bike trip just by slapping a sticker on the frame, or find out when your flowers need watering by using an augmented pot. Estimote even pictures stores using the tags to automatically cue up product info on a nearby screen, so you could find out whether some hot new shoes come in your size just by taking them off the shelf.

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We got an up-close look at Sony's tennis gadget back at CES, and after a May launch in Japan, the accessory is prepped to hit the court in the US and Canada. The Smart Tennis Sensor plays nice with rackets from Wilson, Prince and Yonex to capture information about your swing, serve and more to a companion app on both iOS and Android. You can also opt for Memory Mode to hold details on up to 12,000 shots with internal storage for post-match analysis. The add-on is IP65-rated to keep water and dust at bay while you collect data on your game. As you might expect, in addition to all the action tracking, you can broadcast your progress to all your pals via the social network of your choosing. There's still no exact word on an arrival date in North America, but Sony says Wilson will start selling the $200 gadget through its tennis retail channels "by the end of January 2015." Even if you have to wait a full year after the device first broke from cover, at least you'll be able to grab one before the great outdoors tempt with spring weather.

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